Jean Louise O’Sullivan interview

257875-04_large

Many thanks to Jean Louise O’Sullivan for agreeing to do an interview with us. The question I really wanted to ask – “so, I’ve watched Jester in 11 films and I don’t think he’s done a damn thing in any of them. What’s that about?” I decided to leave til I get an interview with Charles Band, Full Moon head honcho. She’s my favourite thing about “Puppet Master X: Axis Rising”, so I ask her a little about that, a little about her other work, and hopefully try and make her laugh so she doesn’t think I’m some lunatic obsessed with the minutiae of low-budget films. (our notes on the interview will follow in the comments)

· There’s quite a few actors and actresses who appear in multiple Full Moon films. Is it a good place to work, or do they just pay well?

Full Moon is a great place to work. When I work on a project with them I’m getting the opportunity to work with some my closest friends and favorite crew members in the entertainment industry. The reason I work with Full Moon time and time again is simply because I love making movies.

· Were you a fan of low-budget and genre films before starting work in them? If so, any favorites stick in your mind?

I have always been a huge fan of low-budget films. The B movie world has long been a place where like minded people can come together and experiment with making new kinds of movies. It’s very exciting for me to work on a project where the crew comes together to make something cool with limited resources. Some of my favorite low-budget films are; Little Shop of Horrors, Dolls, Evil Dead 2, The Masque of the Red Death, Toxic Avenger, Puppet Master, and Trancers.
· Now, this might only be of interest to film nerds like me, but were the historical problems ever mentioned on the Puppet Master X set – that the US didn’t join the war til 1941, and that kamikaze pilots weren’t a thing til 1944, while the film was set in 1939?

We shot Puppet Master X in 10 days… there was no time to worry about or discuss any of the historical problems. I think everyone was more focused on trying to get the new puppet ,Blitzkrieg, to work properly. That thing had a mind of it’s own!
· Is that last question a bit ridiculous given that it’s a film series about puppets that kill people?

Puppet homicide is definitely more the focus of this film than presenting a faithful rendition of World War II history.
· Have you got any news about a third film in the “Axis” sequence, or is a relaunch of the series more likely to be coming next?

I don’t know if there will be another Puppet Master film. I was thrilled to be a part of the tenth installment and I know Charlie Band was happy with how the film turned out. Ten is a nice round number for a popular franchise like Puppet Master. But if the Full Moon fans are looking to see more puppet murders, we can’t disappoint them.

13889240_ori
* I’ve been trying to think of names of sequels for the Ginderdead Man franchise, and I’ve come up with Gingerdead Man: The Serial Killer’s Guide To The Galaxy (set in space, naturally). Or “There Will Be Ginger”, set in the old days of mining. If you pitched them a potential sequel, what name do you think you’d go for?

LOL I would love to see those movies! I think if I was going to pitch a gingerdead man film it would be something like:
‘Gingerdead Man, the Golden Years; Salt and Paprika’ – it would be an independent art film where the the cookie is at the end of his life. He reflects on all the bad decisions he’s made and ponders the existence of heaven and hell. Ultimately he comes to terms with the chaos he’s inflicted during his incarnation as a cookie. Then Gary Busy devours the stale cookie. Fin. It will for sure get nominated for things.
* I notice you’ve worked on “Tim and Eric: Awesome Show, Great Job”. How odd was the experience compared to how odd their show is?

My experience working with Tim and Eric was Awesome! Seriously, those guys have the best time ever making that show. It was really fun working with them. The studio we filmed in was kind of dumpy. It almost felt like we were shooting in their parents garage or something. That dumpy atmosphere made the focus so much less about “Wow! I’m working in Television Production!” and so much more about “Ok, we have a bunch of costumes and props and stuff. We’re all here to make something crazy and weird. How crazy and weird can we get with this?” It was fun. The team they work with is super interesting and creative.
* You produced as well as starred in “The Bates Haunting”. Was the double duty interesting, and is it something you’d like to do again?

Double duty on ‘The Bates Haunting’ was challenging to say the least. Honestly, I have never worked so hard in my life. But despite the hard work I would love to produce another film, and my next project is not far off. I have been reading a lot of screenplays and working on a few scripts of my own. It’s all about finding a project I can make well.
* What’s coming up next for you (in other words, please plug your upcoming films)?

‘The Bates Haunting’ is currently available on DVD in Walmart and other major retailers.
You can catch me playing a nurse on season two of Jim Jefferies show ‘Legit’ on FXX. I play Melanie Parker in ‘AlphaHouse’ an upcoming Asylum film being released April 1st of this year. I’m also working on a new project with Full Moon… but that is all top secret for the time being.

Get yourself a copy of my latest release
http://www.amazon.com/The-Bates-Haunting-Jean-Louise-OSullivan/dp/B00DMOVIRK

Follow Jean Louise
https://twitter.com/OJeanLouiseO

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Jean Louise O’Sullivan interview

  1. It’s all fun mocking low-budget movies, but when you realise that they’re made in 10 days, and the people have to love what they do to do it, for little money and little reward, it makes the snarkiness of my reviews seem a little mean. Considering those pressures, “Puppet Master X” is a damn masterpiece (and I suspect many of the other films I’ve reviewed would have been made in similarly challenging circumstances).

    I say this quite a bit, but if you like this interview or even any of my reviews, please try and support low-budget cinema. Like Jean said, there’s people out there experimenting and making genuinely interesting films, and if people like us can buy the occasional DVD or online rental of one of them, it’ll make a difference in a way it doesn’t with your multi-million-dollar blockbusters.

  2. Pingback: Puppet Master news! |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s